Technology development – force transmission  

Many interested in technological advances in the Philippines are accustomed to keeping one eye firmly on what is happening elsewhere in the Far East. Japanese developers have been consistently relied on to provide interesting takes on the world of technical innovation.
Recently a researcher in Japan, Kouhei Ohnishi, unveiled his latest invention – a device that will instantly (and wirelessly) transmit a force between twin devices. At the very least he claimed this experiment proved the potential to allow physical therapists to treat their patients remotely. The so-called ‘force transceiver' may, at face value, seem like the type of thing first dreamt up in the imaginations of the Star Wars screenplay-writers back in the 1970s, but Ohnishi was quick to underline the machine's potential in real-life scenarios.
Chief amongst its properties is the ability to permit two-way communication of the amount of pressure applied, and the resistance encountered, in real time. To place that in a more practical perspective, Ohnishi stated that it could be applied to a robot. In this way, a skilled operator could use his force transmitter to remotely carry-out functions in areas unsafe for humans, such as high temperature, underwater or radiation-hazardous environments.
Ohnishi explained to reporters: ‘For physical therapy, the feeling and movement of therapists must be transferred without any delay. The therapist will also be able to feel how well the patient's limbs are moving, for example, which is a key piece of information'.
Ohnishi went on to elaborate that this technology could also help to reduce the burden on medical systems, while at the same time greatly increasing convenience-levels for patients. Technology would also allow the levels of force being applied to be tempered according to their specific situations. The Keio University system design engineering professor also stated: ‘We could apply this technology to do construction work that could not be done by humans'.
Ohnishi went on to elaborate that this technology could also help to reduce the burden on medical systems, while at the same time greatly increasing convenience-levels for patients. Technology would also allow the levels of force being applied to be tempered according to their specific situations. The Keio University system design engineering professor also stated: ‘We could apaThe force transmitter would allow high-speed wireless communications that was many, many times more powerful than the existing WiFi connectivity used for domestic web connections. Alongside this technology would be high-speed computing capacity.ply this technology to do construction work that could not be done by humans'.
Ohnishi demonstrated the technology behind his theory by building a pair of box-like tools, with levers on the top. A user moved the lever on one unit, and the lever on the second moved at precisely the same force and speed, in perfect synchronization.

 

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